Project: Perspective

Exercise: Parallel perspective: an interior view

Perspective drawing

Interior view – this was my first drawing.  I found it difficult. The horizon line (or eye – level) was not meeting with the parallel lines.   One thing I found difficult was drawing a straight line free hand.  So I tried again – see the drawing below.

Perspective drawing.

Interior view – second drawing.  This was more successful than my first drawing, although I still did not get the perspective lines right.  I also found that I could not fit the door frame into the drawing.

Exercise: Angular perspective

First for this exercise I have drawn a house.

Angular perspective - first drawing

Angular perspective – first drawing.  I enjoyed making this drawing, but a lot of the angles are wrong.  The exercise actually says that the horizon lines where the angles go to will not be on the page anyway, so I’m not sure how to measure accuracy.  After making this drawing I decided to try drawing books as the exercise suggests as an alternative to drawing houses, as I thought this might help me to get to grips with the method of drawing.

Drawing books for angular perspective - One.  For this drawing I used blue Quink ink and pencils.

Drawing books for angular perspective – One. For this drawing I used blue Quink ink and pencils.

Angular perspective - drawing books - two.  I used a 5B pencil for this, but found that this was not appropriate for the task.  So I changed to a B pencil for more accuracy after this drawing.

Angular perspective – drawing books – two. I used a 5B pencil for this, but found that this was not appropriate for the task. So I changed to a B pencil for more accuracy after this drawing.

Angular perspective - at this point I felt that I was not really making progress,  so I thought I should step back and try to better understand the method I was using.  I tried drawing the eye-level line and the lines to the disappearing point without drawing anything else.  Then I tried drawing in the lines of cuboid shapes.  This helped me to process the method more fully, although you can see from the drawings that my experiments were flawed.

Angular perspective – at this point I felt that I was not really making progress, so I thought I should step back and try to better understand the method I was using. I tried drawing the eye-level line and the lines to the disappearing point without drawing anything else. Then I tried drawing in the lines of cuboid shapes. This helped me to process the method more fully, although you can see from the drawings that my experiments were flawed.

Angular perspective - fourth page of book drawings.  These drawings are still not accurate.  I have developed a way of looking at an angle - looking at it like it was a hand on a clock.  But somehow it is very difficult.  None of the eye-view lines are on this page (the right hand drawing is on its side) even so I don't think they look like they are going to meet correctly.

Angular perspective – fourth page of book drawings. These drawings are still not accurate. I have developed a way of looking at an angle – looking at it like it was a hand on a clock. But somehow it is very difficult. None of the eye-view lines are on this page (the right hand drawing is on its side) even so I don’t think they look like they are going to meet correctly.

Below is a simplified drawing of Sir Muirhead Bone’s drawing Rome which uses perspective.  I have drawn in perspective lines to the vanishing point.  The vanishing point does not seem to be on my page.

Rome . Sir Muirhead Bone

Rome . Sir Muirhead Bone

Check and Log - Copy (3)

 What problems did you find in executing perspective drawings?

I found it difficult to get all the angles correct.  I also found at first that striving for accuracy in respect to angles made me tense and blundering and forgetful in respect to other aspects of drawing.  I think I have gotten over this now, but still I found it difficult to get the angles correct so that the perspective lines could meet at the vanishing point.  I found that the vanishing point was almost always off my page – which I think is probably due to some mistake of mine (but I don’t know what that mistake is).

Make note on the merits of using, or not using, rulers to guide you.

I have found that, so far, I have an unsteady hand when it comes to long straight lines.  I have yet to make a fairly straight free-hand line longer than fourteen centimetres.  So I can see definite benefits to using a ruler to guide you.  Rulers are also very useful after you make a drawing to measure if the perspective lines meet at the vanishing point.

But I think if you used rulers to draw each straight line on a building or a box or a book then you might lose the sense of reality and lose the essence of the object in the image.  I think you might use a ruler to plan the angles and lines of a drawing, and make points on the page for the lines to meet at, and then draw the lines free-hand.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s