Project: Proportions

Exercise – Quick poses From the textbook: “It is important to familiarise yourself with the figure and composition in front of you by making some quick preliminary sketches in charcoal or graphite.  First draw five two minute sketches of the model in your sketchbook, paying particular attention to the proportions and just using basic lines that describe the figure.”

I made a selection of two minute drawings.  I used graphite on cartridge paper.  The images here are larger if you click on them.

Quick poses drawings - preliminary sketches in graphite

Quick poses drawings – preliminary sketches in graphite

Quick poses - preliminary sketches in graphite

Quick poses – preliminary sketches in graphite

Two minute study on gridded paper.

Two minute study on gridded paper with a broad pencil.

“Draw from the middle of the body out to the feet and the head.”  I found this tricky, but I got used to it the more I practised. “Then make two ten-minute drawings.  Be free in your use of charcoal or graphite across the paper.  Try not to erase any incorrect lines.”   Below are my ten minute drawings:

Ten minute drawing

Ten minute drawing

Ten minute drawing

Ten minute drawing

Quick poses - Ten minute Study.

Quick poses – Ten minute Study.

Notes about the planes and shapes of the body – A plane is two dimensional, it has a length and a width.  There are planes on the body, the surface shape of the body, the legs have curves and the stomach and bottom and face all are curves.  A shape is the outline of something, or the external three-dimensional form of somebody or and object. To draw the form you need tone and shadows, maybe texture.  I drew in some tone and texture when I had time.  But the drawings which are linear give you a good idea of the outline shape of the human form, and the bench she sits on. The exercise suggests to do some more drawings of this pose in different media, such as pencils, charcoal, pens, felt tips or ball points.

Further drawings of this pose using pencils, pens and felt tips.

Further drawings of this pose using pencils, pens and felt tips.  This drawing went askew because it was a rapid drawing.  The upper portion of the model is fairly error free, relatively speaking.

the quick pose 2

The drawings above and below are A3 drawings drawn with stick and ink on paper which I painted.  I made these drawings in response to advice and suggestions in my tutor’s feedback.

The drawing on blue paper was first drawn in blue inks, and then I added more definition with black, because the figure was difficult to see.

You can see that the painted paper has an uneven surface.  I liked drawing with stick and ink, it makes a drawing more exciting, and adds different qualities of line.

Quick poses 1

A different quick pose drawn when someone in my family happened to stand still for some time.  After a while they moved so it was around a five minute drawing, and the legs are a little too long.  This was an interesting pose to draw because it is a side view with a partial view of the back.

A spontaneous quick pose drawn when someone in my family happened to stand still for some time. After a while they moved so it was around a five minute drawing, and the legs are a little too long. This was an interesting pose to draw because it is a side view with a partial view of the back.  I think also the head might be too small.

img171

I returned to this exercise for further practise.

Exercise: The longer pose This drawing took one hour.

The Longer Pose - pencil on A3 cartridge paper.

The Longer Pose – pencil on A3 cartridge paper. (Click to enlarge) This drawing took around an hour and a half, with breaks.

I decided to make another Longer pose drawing:

The longer pose - this drawing took one hour, with breaks every twenty minutes.

The longer pose – this drawing took one hour, with breaks every twenty minutes.

DSCN1175

Detail from the above drawing.

The longer pose

Above is a longer pose drawing I made in response to my tutor’s advice to use more stick and ink (and other unpredictable media) and also to use coloured papers (I painted the paper myself).

Check and Log - Copy (3)

I have managed to make a complete statement in this time.  My longer pose drawing is finished with lots of detail and tone.  I am pleased with the proportions and the scale.  I needed to use what I learned in the exercises on perspective. My main problems were drawing accurate proportions in a short space of time, in the quick pose drawings.

How well have you captured the characteristics of the pose? I think I have effectively captured the characteristics of the poses I have drawn.  The shapes and lines depict the characteristics and show the image, if in a distorted way, because of the proportions being off in some places.

Do the proportions look right?  If not, how will you improve this? As above you have seen that the proportions were problematic in the quick pose drawings, I intend to improve this problem by carefully drawing my image in faintly before proceeding to draw in darker media. (this is not to say that I have not already been doing this, but say that I will try to improve my ability to do this correctly, when drawing quickly.)

Other notes – Exercise – quick poses I found this pose challenging because of the angle at which the model was sitting.  You can see the front of her upper body and the side of her hips and legs.  I had difficulties drawing her back and her thigh because I could not seem to measure it correctly in proportion with the rest of her body.  It was always to large or too small or too flat. “Draw marks on the figure to show that you have measured the proportions correctly” – I did not do this. I forgot.  In two minute intervals it just slipped my mind to do that; I did measure the proportions and make dots, but then I drew lines over where the dots were.

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