Project: The clothed figure

Exercise: Fabric with line and form

Fabric with line and form

Fabric with line and form

Fabric with line and form

Fabric with line and form

Above are two drawings of a dressing gown on the arm of the settee.

For this drawing below I used ink and wash.  This is a study of a large sheet thrown over a sofa.  I am pleased with this drawing because water and ink is very good for drawing the different tones in the ripples of the fabric.

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Below is another ink and wash drawing, this time of a zip jacket on a chair.  This was challenging to draw but I think it turned out well.

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Below:
Five minute sketches in five centimetre squares.

Upon reflection, I think perhaps I zoomed in too far in my five centimetre squares.  I have sketched  different parts of the fabric, and I have drawn areas of light and shade.  But I think they emphasize texture rather than form.  Three of them focus on folds.

I think they were helpful, nevertheless, because I developed my ideas about how to draw clothing.

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Exercise: Form and movement in a clothed figure

Oil pastel on textured beige pastel paper. (A3)

Oil pastel on textured beige pastel paper. (A3)

Study of the clothed figure.

Study of the clothed figure - oil pastels on green textured pastel paper. Arms folded. (A3)

Study of the clothed figure – oil pastels on green textured pastel paper. Arms folded. (A3)

Study of the clothed figure - blue acrylic ink on A3 cartridge paper.

Study of the clothed figure – blue acrylic ink on A3 cartridge paper.

Study of the clothed figure – below is a study I made using collage with ink and brush.

It is an A3 drawing and I used texture rubbings I made from the surface of the ground outside my house to make the texture of the towelling dressing gown my model wore.

I stuck down the rubbings in the area of the figure, and then I drew my drawing over the top.  I used tissue paper and a blank page from a novel for rubbing the textures with graphite.  Even though the textured papers spread out beyond the edges of the dressing gown, I think this is an effective way of portraying the surface of the cloth.

The clothed figure

Check and Log - Copy (3)

Did you find it easy to approach the figure as a whole or were you distracted by details of the sitter’s dress?

I did not find it difficult to approach the figure as a whole, because I asked my model to wear plain clothing.  Most of the figure was covered by loose fabric.

How did you create volume in the folds of fabric?

I used different mark making techniques to observe texture and shadows, and I think the grading of tone helps to show volume.

Does the finished drawing give a sense of the figure beneath the fabric?

Yes, the shadows in the folds of fabric around the knees, the shadows in the stomach, and on the fabric on the arms all contribute to the sense of the figure; even though you can’t see the forms of the knees and things, you can get a sense of the knees because of the folds of the fabric.

How would you tackle a drawing like this again?

I think I could do with practising this sort of mark making in oil pastels, I imagine that you could create further levels of tone and texture using more than one colour, etc.

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