Research and reflection 3

(For this page I am going to begin at the top and work downward from there.)

My tutor has recommended that I read (among other things) “Sketchbooks:The Hidden Art of Designers, Illustrators and Creatives”  I have started reading it and it is very inspiring.  I have scanned some of the images to record some of what is important to me.

As well as many other reasons, one reason this book is valuable is that it helps me to think about composition and layout on a page.

Sketchbook pages from the artist Renato Alarcao.

Sketchbook pages from the artist Renato Alarcao.

Alarcão uses different media and combines watercolour paintings with collaged pieces from newspapers and envelopes.  I like his pages because they have a spontaneous feeling about them.  The drawings don’t correspond with one another, at the same time they do communicate with each other because they just can’t help it.  The colours and the shapes and the lines all communicate.  I like that the upper drawing flows onto the next page, and the envelope is just in the corner.  I like how he uses text also.

Lauren Simkin Berke - Sketches for The Lacy Project postcard Agfa-Brovlra, 2007

Lauren Simkin Berke – Sketches for The Lacy Project postcard Agfa-Brovlra, 2007

Lauren Simkin Berke’s sketchbook pages have lots of boxes.  I notice that about some of them.  This is an interesting way to work – with some things in boxes, dividing them, separating them from the rest of the images.  It gives different pages something in common, but it also affects the way the whole page looks.  I don’t know if this is important.  I think it is important.  She has drawings and she has notes written around the images.  Some of the notes are crossed out.  What happens is that it all looks very linear.  That is why the boxes are important! Maybe.  Because the drawings being boxed in creates straight lines, vertical and horizontal.  And the written lines of notes also create lines, mostly horizontal.

Also I like how she uses a lot of hatching and dotting in her drawings.  And she uses mostly just black, or just red.  Or just black and red.  So that is monochromatic or duo-chromatic.  It is a striking way to draw.

More sketchbook pages from Lauren Simkin Berke.

More sketchbook pages from Lauren Simkin Berke.

I think also Simkin Berke’s drawings are valuable because they show how you could use composition.  (I’m not just referring to her thumbnail drawings, I mean all her pages, in fact all the pages in Richard Bereton’s book are different examples of composition, different approaches to composition.

Marion Deuchars sketchbook page - "Page from Cuba Sketchbook Diary, 1999." I think I like this a lot because of the colours, and the integration of the list of dates with the drawing which is just perfect.

Marion Deuchars’ sketchbook page – “Page from Cuba Sketchbook Diary, 1999.” I think I like this a lot because of the colours, and the integration of the list of dates with the drawing which is just perfect.

Chris Gilvan-Cartwright sketchbook pages.  I chose this artist because he uses old novels as sketchbooks, which is something I like to do.  I also think it is interesting how he scratches into his wet paint to make lines.

Chris Gilvan-Cartwright sketchbook pages. I chose this artist because he uses old novels as sketchbooks, which is something I like to do. I also think it is interesting how he scratches into his wet paint to make lines.

Gilvan-Cartwright’s pages work with the text on a page.  He fills pages with drawings and paintings which is something I do not usually like to do.  Although I do that when I scribble; I like to fill pages with scribble.

Flo Heiss sketchbook drawing.

Flo Heiss sketchbook drawing.

Flo Heiss’ drawings are very interesting.  I like the way he combines oil pastels with graphite pencils because it’s just really exciting.  It works really well to use fine lines with broad coloured lines; to use wild, broad, smudged lines and equally wild more defined pencil lines lines.

I think his drawings record both visual reality and emotional reality.  I like the way he writes notes in the middle of the drawing.  It is a complete contrast to the tidily boxed Simkin Berke’s sketchbook pages.  That is why this book is so valuable – because it has such a variety of approaches.  I like that he draws colours, but they do not always or entirely line up with the pencil drawing.  It creates this feeling that it is not all slotted together, and also a feeling of movement.  You feel like he is drawing really fast.

Flo Heiss sketchbook page

Flo Heiss sketchbook page

I have found more of Heiss’ sketchbook pages on the internet at this address:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/14328358@N00/sets/72157600505209659/  You can’t copy pictures from that website, so I can’t record them here, but there are examples of drawings of landscapes, organic forms and animals, as well as people.

Peter James Field, sketchbook page.  Riitta is holding a paperclip.

Peter James Field, sketchbook page. Riitta is holding a paperclip.

Peter James Field’s pages are varied – with almost photographic drawings in coloured pencil.  I like this page because he uses scribbling in the dark space around the figure.  I like the combination of the drawing styles.  I like also that he writes at the top or bottom of his drawings, sort of labelling them.

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I happened across an artist called Laura Owens and I found she has a unique way of drawing trees, so I thought I would record her pictures here.  All of her art works can be found at this address: http://owenslaura.com/drawings/?r=0

Laura Owens

Untitled, 2001, watercolour, acrylic, and collage paper on paper, 39.5 x 27.5″

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My favourites of her drawings are when she uses collage to make different elements of her image.  I will have to try this.  Laura Owens uses reality to draw from, and then she embellishes from her imagination in a decorative way.

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I have been reading another book recommended to me by my tutor, called “Extraordinary Sketchbooks” by Jane Stobart.  It is a very interesting book, I like it a lot and find it really helpful to inform my own sketchbook practice.

David Meldrum's sketchbook.  From Jane Stobart's "Extraordinary Sketchbooks"

David Meldrum’s sketchbook. From Jane Stobart’s “Extraordinary Sketchbooks”

David Meldrum

I like Meldrum’s approach because he really examines the things he is drawing.  The pages shown here select different elements of the objects and highlight them; particularly colour, shape and line.  Seeing the different parts of something separated in this way helps you to visually understand it.

Below are some drawings by William Kentridge, from Extraordinary Sketchbooks.  This is relevant to me because I like to draw in old books.  It makes me recognise, how ever, that sometimes it can become tempting to be precious about a drawing or a book of drawings; which inhibits your ability to experiment freely and thoroughly.  So you have to watch out for that.

William Kentridge

William Kentridge

William Kentridge

William Kentridge

William Kentridge

William Kentridge

Below are some of Richard Bell’s sketchbook pages.  I like how he makes little drawings and notes around and between the drawings.  This is something I almost never do, which I would like to get into the habit of doing.

Richard Bell

Richard Bell

Below are some sketchbook samples from Harry Eccleston.  I like how he makes little drawings all over a page and notes around.  He makes busy pages which are buzzing with information and thought.

Harry Eccleston

Harry Eccleston

Harry Eccleston

Harry Eccleston

Below are some samples of Alice Courtley’s sketchbooks.  She sticks in photocopies into her book, as well as making her own studies of artists’ works.  I make a note of her also because she makes hand written notes around her images.  She also experiments with decorative typography for her titles, which is incorporating art and text which I am interested in.

Alice Courtley

Alice Courtley

Alice Courtley

Alice Courtley

Below I have recorded examples of Nick Clarke’s work because he makes a lot of notes which is very thorough and reflective.  It is useful to thoroughly note down every idea and thought you have about every element of something.  I think it would be a worth while practice to get into the habit of.

Nick Clarke

Nick Clarke

Nick Clarke

Nick Clarke

Nick Clarke

Nick Clarke

Below are examples of Karen Butti’s sketchbooks.  These are unusual works because she combines textiles into her sketchbook work, using stitch to draw different lines, patterns, colours and textures.  This is another method with which you can layer a drawing to get different effects and depth.

Karen Butti

Karen Butti

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 Below are some cuttings I found from magazines.  I find magazines and books with pictures really make me want to draw.  They are inspiring. I’ve put some of them below in twice because they look different depending on which way up they are.  If you click on them they get bigger.

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