Research point: Landscape drawing

This page has research into Albrecht Durer, Claude Lorrain and L S Lowry.

Here are some drawings by Albrecht Durer.  He uses broad brush strokes and fine lines.  I think he uses colour effectively, and demonstrates aerial perspective.

Albrecht Durer - Landscape study.

Albrecht Durer – Landscape study.

He uses washes of colour for hills and trees and fine lines and  straight lines for buildings which demonstrates a contrast of form.  You can look at his drawings and see how important lines are in landscapes.  In the drawing below there are lines which divide fields and the line of the river and the lines which mark the edges of the hills.

Albrecht Durer - Landscape drawing.

Albrecht Durer – Landscape drawing.

The drawing below has a lot of sky in it.  It has depth because you see water in the foreground, buildings in the middle ground, and mountains in the background between the buildings.  You can see the buildings reflected in the water, and the light is coming from the right hand side.

Albrecht Durer - Innsbruck von Norden, 1496.

Albrecht Durer – Innsbruck von Norden, 1496.

The drawing below is interesting because there is more detail in the background than the foreground.  I wonder why this would be.

Albrecht Dürer - Landscape near Segonzano in the Cembra Valley

Albrecht Dürer – Landscape near Segonzano in the Cembra Valley

The drawing below is I think another study.  This drawing is flatter than Durer’s others because he has used outlines.  The foreground is drawn in watery washes of colour.  Perhaps the different methods of drawing are good ways of showing the stark contrast between rolling hills and man-made structures.

Albrecht Dürer - Segonzano

Albrecht Dürer – Segonzano

Here below are some drawings by Claude Lorrain.  He uses pen and ink as well as washes and chalks; working together these make particularly misty images which have the appearance of depth.

Claude Lorrain (about 1600–1682), Landscape with a Tower, about 1635-40. Pen and grey/brown wash on off-white paper, ruled in red chalk. Städel Musuem, Frankfurt am Main.

“Claude Lorrain (about 1600–1682), Landscape with a Tower, about 1635-40. Pen and grey/brown wash on off-white paper, ruled in red chalk. Städel Musuem, Frankfurt am Main.”

These drawings are interesting.  You can see in Landscape with a Tower that He has divided his page into six sections for perspective measurements.  The trees in the foreground are darker than the other things in the image because the light is coming from somewhere off behind them.  I think these drawings really help you to see how valuable it is to see where the light is coming from to see the depth of an image.

Claude Gellée, called Claude Lorrain (1600–1682) Heroic Landscape Black chalk, pen and brown ink, brown, gray and some blue wash, on paper. 10 1/16 x 15 11/16 inches (254 x 396 mm)

“Claude Lorrain – Heroic Landscape.  Black chalk, pen and brown ink, brown, gray and some blue wash, on paper.
10 1/16 x 15 11/16 inches (254 x 396 mm)”

The things in the background are paler than those in the middle ground are paler than those in the foreground; except for things which are just in the shade.  I think a lot of shade might complicate a drawing’s perspective.

In the image below the figures and animals are darker than the trees, which is maybe because of shade.  I think they make the image bottom heavy.  I think all of these elements in the foreground are distracting from the view into the distance.  I wonder if this is intentional?

The View of the Acqua Acetosa

The View of the Acqua Acetosa

Below are a collection of drawings by L S Lowry.

 

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L S Lowry

L S Lowry - Wet Earth Colliery Dixon

L S Lowry – Wet Earth Colliery Dixon

L S Lowry Bandstand Peel Park

L S Lowry Bandstand Peel Park

Church Street

Church Street

The Tower

The Tower

Study for Dwellings Ordsall Lane, Salford

Study for Dwellings Ordsall Lane, Salford

County Court Salford

County Court Salford

The Flat Iron Market

The Flat Iron Market

I have seen L S Lowry’s paintings in the past and not paid much attention to the buildings and landscapes – I was always captivated by the people in the drawings.  It is interesting for me now to see all of his work in a different light; to view his drawings as landscapes, the people as part of the landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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