Paul Cezanne

Paul Cezanne faced the difficulty that he was a Post Impressionist.  Post Impressionists were no longer necessities of society.  Compared with artists in the early eighteenth century, who had more commissions and there was more demand for paintings.  Post Impressionists had to have gallery exhibitions to try to sell their work.

But seeing as their works were not commissions, they had freedom to paint what ever they liked.  They created aims of their own to challenge themselves.  “Cezanne aimed to maintain the vividness of the Impressionists; but also he aimed to achieve the structure and harmony of classical art”.  I found this information in a book called Aesthetic Criteria: Gombrich and the Philosophies of Science of Popper and Polanyi by Sheldon Saul Richmond.

I have looked into Cezanne’s paintings and found a wide selection of paintings of Mont Sainte-Victoire from lots of different view points which are really interesting, and also seem the most relevant to this exercise.

Cezanne uses aggressive marks to paint the sky and the foreground.

Le Mont Sainte-Victoire vu des Lauves

Le Mont Sainte-Victoire vu des Lauves

La Mont Sainte-Victoire

La Mont Sainte-Victoire

The painting above seems to be almost entirely made up of line.  I keep seeing the landscape built up out of millions of lines; short fat lines, long thin lines, lines which start out wide and taper off, dry brush marks.  Straight lines and curvy lines.  Lines drawing jagged angles.  Drawing from behind a tree alters the view fairly drastically.

Mont Sainte-Victoire

Mont Sainte-Victoire

This drawing above is seems to be painted using blocks of colour.  It is a distorted depiction.  It is also drawn from a further distance from the mountain, creating an asymmetrical composition.

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1885-87

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1885-87

The painting above is interesting because the tree in the foreground really draws your attention away from the mountain, and obscures the skies.  It is very different in colour from the drawing below which was made just under a decade later.  The colours are dulled by comparison.

Mont Sainte-Victoire seen from les Lauves 1904-06

Mont Sainte-Victoire seen from les Lauves 1904-06

The painting below has the mountain filling the space.

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1897

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1897

This painting below seems to have been created on portrait oriented paper – this draws attention to the distance between the viewer, or artist, and the mountain; it is a very interesting way of observing depth in an image.

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1902

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1902

This painting uses strong vibrant colours.  You can see an outline of shadow around the tops of the mountain, around the top of most things in this depiction.  And shadows are also on the left side, suggesting that the sun was coming from the right.  I can see marks which are like short fat dashes in this painting also.

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1900

Mont Sainte-Victoire 1900

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