Research and Reflection 5

I came across a really interesting way of working at this website: http://yaprogramactivities.wordpress.com/2014/08/25/post-it-note-art-show/

This example is of a collaboration between a group of artists, but you could work in this way independently.  I would be interested to try out working in this way, because it is an alternative approach to making a large drawing by making a large piece of work out of drawings.

Here is their collaboration:

post-it-note-show-022-copy yaprogramactivities.wordpress.com

Here are some examples of their work in more detail:

post-it-note-show-027 post-it-note-show-023-copy post-it-note-show-024-copy post-it-note-show-025-copy post-it-note-show-026 ya program activities wordpress

Here is my first try at this:

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I am pleased with this because you have the images working together to makes it more interesting.  This way of looking at drawings is dynamic and exciting.

I have come across an artist who also uses this method of using lots of pieces of paper to make one artwork in the Vitamin D: New Perspectives in Drawing book:  Joseph Grigley.

Joseph Grigley

Joseph Grigley

His drawings use handwriting rather than shapes and tones.  It is a fascinating approach to line drawing.

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I have been drawing the rooms in my house, and in the process of researching Vuillard’s work I came across Bonnard’s drawings and paintings of rooms in his house.

http://www.tate.org.uk/ has a good selection of drawings by artists which are useful to see.  Here is a preparatory sketch for “Coffee” by Bonnard.

Preparatory Sketch for 'Coffee' 1915 by Pierre Bonnard 1867-1947

Here are some other preparatory sketches for a painting called ‘The Bowl of Milk’

Le Bol de lait
Preparatory Sketch for 'The Bowl of Milk' circa 1919 by Pierre Bonnard 1867-1947 Preparatory Sketch for 'The Bowl of Milk' circa 1919 by Pierre Bonnard 1867-1947
And here are some of his paintings.

Nude in the Bath is a great example for an unusual viewpoint angle: looking down and across.  The colours in this painting are fantastic!  The mosaic pattern floor has a similarity to the surface of rippling water.  The artist is looking down at the figure in the bath, and there is a little dog looking up at the artist (or the viewer).

Nude in the bath 1941-46

Nude in the bath 1941-46

This painting below has lots of linear elements, vertical and horizontal lines.  With warm yellow, and the use of a mirror.  The artist has made use of a corner.

Interior - 1913

Interior – 1913

Below is a busy image, with several areas to focus on.  There is a view out the window, the radiator and the mantle pieces, as well as the table with the objects and chair.

The White Interior 1932

The White Interior 1932

Bonnard uses colour really well in his pictures; I have found colour very useful in my studies because they add atmosphere and observe personality of a space.  In Dining room on the Garden I like that the objects on the table make a still life, with the view out the window in the background, and the golden walls with the figure in the corner.

Dining room on the  Garden 1934-5

Dining room on the Garden 1934-5

I came across a book cover with art work by artist illustrator Volker Strater:

Volker Strater

Volker Strater

I have collected pictures I like from magazines, because they are inspiring.

Rafal Milach

Rafal Milach

Rafal Milach

His website is here for further research.  http://rafalmilach.com/ I mostly like Milach’s image because of the way it is laid out, with two pictures opposite each other and handwriting and black tape.  It is like a mixed media drawing.

Georgia Metaxas – photograph from magazine:

Georgia Metaxas - photograph from magazine

Georgia Metaxas – photograph from magazine

I also have a picture of a section of the picture above because I like the way it looks when it is enlarged and you can see the printing.

Enlarged section of Georgia Metaxas' work stuck in my book.

Enlarged section of Georgia Metaxas’ work stuck in my book.

Here is Georgia Metaxas’ website which has more of her work and information.  I like her photo because of the colours and the lines.  I also like the composition.  Shape is important in this image, because the figure is a shape, the sign and the lamposts are shapes, there is a wall, so it’s not a very deep image.  All of these qualities are interesting.   But especially the colours.  Reds and blues echo through the image. http://www.georgiametaxas.com/frameset.htm

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Ghadah Alkandari is an artist in Kuwait.  I like her drawings because they have their own style and personality.  I also like her drawings because she seems to work in ways that I like to work, such as working on found paper or book pages and drawing people, drawing similar images over and again in different colours and media.
 Ghada Alcahandry little-ones-01 little-ones-doodle Ghadah Alkandari little-ones-ticker-tape Ghadah Alkandari little-one-striped little-one-dear-john Ghadah Alkandari
It is useful to see these drawings by this artist, as they are her process drawings, sketchbook drawings and things.  You can see her paintings that she exhibits are of a different atmosphere.  I feel very lucky to see the drawings because they provide insight into where a painting can start from, or where a drawing might lead.
The images above are from her website http://prettygreenbullet.com/ which is of her art journals, sketchbooks, drawings and doodles.
Ghadah Alkandari has another website which has her biography, exhibition information and images of her paintings and of her in her studio with her paintings.
 http://www.ghadahalkandari.com/bio.html
"Eve plays tek-too", 2011

“Eve plays tek-too”, 2011

"Eve spills a bowl of spaghetti" 2011

“Eve spills a bowl of spaghetti” 2011

"Adam and Eve" 2010

“Adam and Eve” 2010

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I love the way she uses shape, line and colour, and the way the colour is some how separate from the line, like two drawings on top of one another, rather than one drawing with layers.

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It is useful in these pictures to see the different scales of the drawings and paintings.

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I have been looking at Frank Auerbach’s drawings because I found myself drawing in graphite pencil and using a rubber to remove marks and then redrawing and removing again for the tonal drawing exercise.  This reminded me of Auerbach and so I decided to revisit his drawings.

Self portrait

Self portrait

Frank Auerbach, Sandra 1973-74, Pastel and charcoal on paper, 30-1/8 x 22 inches

Frank Auerbach, Sandra 1973-74, Pastel and charcoal on paper, 30-1/8 x 22 inches

Head of E.O.W. 1959-60 Frank Auerbach born 1931 Purchased 1976 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/T02100

Head of E.O.W. 1959‑60

Head of Julia

Head of Julia

He often works into his drawings until he has rubbed away the surface of the paper, or made holes in the paper.  And then patches up the holes and carries on.  I didn’t work so vigorously into my drawings because they were fairly quick studies.

I found that drawing in this way created levels of texture and detail which I have formerly found I could not draw effectively in tonal graphite or charcoal drawings.  Drawing with the eraser, removing graphite makes some great marks.

Frank Auerbach —Head of E.O.W. 1960

Frank Auerbach —Head of E.O.W. 1960

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I have also been looking at Edwin Parker “Cy” Twombly, Jr. because he was an artist who uses expressive mark-making in imaginative drawings.

I think he is a great artist to look at for mark making because his pictures have such an array of marks.

TWOMBLY - Ferragosto I (1961, Roma)

TWOMBLY – Ferragosto I (1961, Roma)

Because of the use of different media he immediately has contrasting lines.  Thin scribbles of graphite, circles of paint, feint smudges of line disappearing into nothing.  Collected areas of marks and empty spaces without anything.

TWOMBLY - Ferragosto II (1961, Roma)

TWOMBLY – Ferragosto II (1961, Roma)

TWOMBLY - Ferragosto III (1961, Roma)

TWOMBLY – Ferragosto III (1961, Roma)

UNTITLED, ROME, JUNE 1960.  OIL, PENCIL, AND OIL STICK ON CANVAS, 37 1..2 X 40 1..16 INCHES.

UNTITLED, ROME, JUNE 1960. OIL, PENCIL, AND OIL STICK ON CANVAS, 37 1..2 X 40 1..16 INCHES.

Untitled 1985 Acrylic Tempera, Oil paint, Coloured Pencil, lead pencil on paper and on wooden panel

Untitled 1985 Acrylic Tempera, Oil paint, Coloured Pencil, lead pencil on paper and on wooden panel

I like this drawing above, because it has the dark solid shape in the centre with the wispy lines of handwriting, which make striking contrasts to each other.

WILDER SHORES OF LOVE 1985.  OIL-BASED HOUSE PAINT, OIL PAINT (PAINT STICK), COLOURED PENCIL AND LEAD PENCIL ON WOODEN PANEL,

WILDER SHORES OF LOVE 1985. OIL-BASED HOUSE PAINT, OIL PAINT (PAINT STICK), COLOURED PENCIL AND LEAD PENCIL ON WOODEN PANEL,

I think it is great how the artist draws in pencil into wet paint.  This is a good technique.

FIFTY DAYS AT ILIAM ACHAEANS IN BATTLE 1978.  OIL, OIL CRAYON, AND GRAPHITE ON CANVAS, 118 X 149 1 2 INCHES (299.7 X 379.7 CM)

FIFTY DAYS AT ILIAM ACHAEANS IN BATTLE 1978. OIL, OIL CRAYON, AND GRAPHITE ON CANVAS, 118 X 149 1 2 INCHES (299.7 X 379.7 CM)

I love the range of textures and marks that Twombly makes use of.  There are aggressive dramatic marks and soft subtle blended marks and they all work together to make mesmerising compositions.  He uses asymmetrical compositions a lot of the time, which is dynamic and fascinating.

The image below is very dramatic with broad red crayon, and then more subtle digits and letters in pencil.

SUMA, 1982.  OIL PAINT, CRAYON, GOUACHE, GRAPHITE, AND COLOR PENCIL ON PAPER, 142,5 X 127,5 CM.

SUMA, 1982. OIL PAINT, CRAYON, GOUACHE, GRAPHITE, AND COLOR PENCIL ON PAPER, 142,5 X 127,5 CM.

Cy Twombly Natural History, Part I, Mushrooms, No. IV 1974 lithograph and mixed media on paper

Cy Twombly Natural History, Part I, Mushrooms, No. IV 1974 lithograph and mixed media on paper

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An other artist I have come across who relates to my work is Zak Smith.  I found his works in  Vitamin D: New Perspectives in Drawing.  He draws portraits of people in rooms.  This reminded me of my current assignment because the rooms seem important and meaningful in his art work.

 I like (in “Charlie”) the blank spaces of wall and door, in black and red, contrasting with the incredibly busy area at the bottom half of the drawing.  The lines and patterns of the fabric with intricate details, and the selective colouring ( Charlie is in black and white, for example).

Charlie

Charlie

The attention to detail that Smith has taken is very impressive, it gives interest and context to the figures he draws.

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The room in “Xian” is made up more out of colour and shape; it takes some deciphering to understand forms and objects out of the chaotic mixture of rainbow patterns and shapes.  I think it is beautiful.

Xian

Xian

I like how Smith has used water and inks for the hair on the figure in “Mara”.  The soft delicacy is intriguing against the black lines and shapes of the room around her.

Mara

Mara

The way this artist combines finely detailed accuracy with loose watery marks is wonderful.  His drawings are absorbing for your mind and your eyes because there is so much to take in.  You can look at the picture as a whole but you cannot help being drawn into the corners as the details lead your eyes in and around.

V in the Corner with a Stuffed Rabbit

V in the Corner with a Stuffed Rabbit

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I chanced upon an artist called Claudia McGill while I was on the internet and I found her personal voice beautiful.  She captures the soul of a room and expresses her personal relationship with a space.

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I like the way she uses bold outlines around objects like furniture chairs and staircases.  I like the way she layers colours and distorts shapes and distances.

Her images are brilliantly imaginative and enticing, looking at scenes from more than one angle or view point, and using artistic license to create exciting compositions with great use of shape, line and colour.

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She has lots more mixed media work to look at on her website: https://claudiamcgillart.wordpress.com

These drawings remind me of Picasso, and also of illustrations in books; they suggest narratives and stimulate my imagination.

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 Felix Vallotton makes use of a doorway in “Interior with a Young Girl Writing”, creating an impressive illusion of depth and making use of different sources of light.  There is shadow in the hallway between the rooms, and shadow behind the door in the room the artist is in.  The room in the distance is brighter.

I came across this painting while researching Degas’ paintings of interiors, and mistook it for a work by Degas.

Edgar Degas (1834-1917) Interior with a Young Girl Writing, 1905-Interior-with-a-Young-Girl-Writing-1905

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